10 responses

  1. Lori
    February 23, 2016

    Wow. What a crazy, life altering thing to have happy to you and your family. I’m kind of speechless.

    Reply

    • Christie
      February 24, 2016

      It was so strange. And strange to think about from this perspective now.
      Christie recently posted…The Only Thing That MattersMy Profile

      Reply

  2. Julie Jo Severson
    February 23, 2016

    Christine, this is amazing! I was at the edge of my seat reading it just now. So profound with unending questions, but OK to not have the answers.

    Reply

  3. Mimi
    February 24, 2016

    This is beautiful Christine, and comes at a time when I needed to read this for so many reasons. Thank you. xo
    Mimi recently posted…A Prescription for PlayMy Profile

    Reply

  4. Laurie Stone
    February 24, 2016

    Wow, Christine. What a story. Anything like this makes us feel vulnerable, how quickly life can be snatched away. I guess you’re right. All we can do is enjoy what we have.
    Laurie Stone recently posted…5 Ways the Dying Teach Us to LiveMy Profile

    Reply

  5. Liz
    February 25, 2016

    Chills. Some powerful writing chops you’ve got. And what a fascinating story. Ever think of expanding on this essay and submitting to a literary magazine that publishes creative nonfiction? Maybe you already did.

    Reply

    • Christie
      February 25, 2016

      Thank you! Let’s just say you might recognize this story in other places 😉
      Christie recently posted…The Only Thing That MattersMy Profile

      Reply

  6. Quirky Chrissy
    February 26, 2016

    Wow. What an emotional story.
    It’s so weird to be a kid when things are happening to your parents and grandparents when you’re not really old enough to understand. I was 8 when my grandpa died. I remember it all very clearly, but the magnitude of it didn’t sink in. It never really sank in. I knew I was supposed to be sad, but I couldn’t cry. I never thought of my mom and how she had two young children to care for when she lost her father. I think abouy how, one day, I’ll lose my father, and I don’t know how I’ll ever survive that. But of course, I will. Life goes on. But when you’re 8 or 9 or 11, you just don’t see what adults experience.
    Quirky Chrissy recently posted…Fighting Jealousy: Slaying My Green-Eyed MonsterMy Profile

    Reply

    • Christie
      February 26, 2016

      Yes, so weird. I have been thinking/writing a lot about these issues lately.
      Christie recently posted…The Only Thing That MattersMy Profile

      Reply

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